In My Time of Dyin’


Original Version:
Blind Willie Johnson

Well, in my time of dying don't want nobody to mourn
All I want for you to do is take my body home
Well, well, well, so I can die easy
Well, well, well
Well, well, well, so I can die easy
Jesus gonna make up, Jesus gonna make up
Jesus gonna make up my dying bed.

Well, meet me Jesus, meet me, meet me in the middle of the air
If these wings should fail to me,
Lord, won't you meet me with another girl ?
Well, well, well, so I can die easy
Well, well, well
Well, well, well, so I can die easy
Jesus gonna make up, Jesus gonna make up
Jesus gonna make up my dying bed.

Lord, in my time of dying don't want nobody to cry
All I want you to do is take me when I die
Well, well, well, so I can die easy
Well, well, well
Well, well, well, so I can die easy
Jesus gonna make up, Jesus gonna make up
Jesus gonna make up my dying bed.

Specifications

blind willie johnson"In My Time of Dying" (also called "Jesus Make Up My Dying Bed" or a variation thereof) is a traditional gospel music song that has been recorded by numerous musicians. The lyrics "Jesus goin' a-make up my dyin' bed" appear in historian Robert Emmet Kennedy's Mellows – A Chronicle of Unknown Singers published in 1925, on Louisiana street performers, and also listed in the Cleveland Library's Index to Negro Spirituals.[1][2] They refer to a deathbed and were inspired by a passage in the Bible from Psalms 41:3 "The Lord will strengthen him upon the bed of languishing, thou wilt make all his bed in his sickness".
In October 1926, Reverend J. C. Burnett recorded "Jesus Is Going to Make Up Your Dying Bed", but it was never issued. A biographer noted that Blind Willie Johnson may have heard Burnett's song or otherwise learned some of his lyrics. Blind Willie Johnson recorded the song during his first recording session on December 3, 1927 as "Jesus Make Up My Dying Bed" and the second take was released as his first single in 1928, backed by "I Know His Blood Can Make Me Whole" (Columbia 14276-D). Johnson performed the song as a gospel blues with his vocal and slide guitar accompaniment, using an open D tuning with a capo resulting in a pitch of E♭.An initial pressing of 9,400 records showed Columbia's confidence in the song, who normally released fewer records for major stars such as Bessie Smith. "A later pressing of 6,000 made this a massive debut record" and one of Johnson's most successful records.

wikipedia compUnless otherwise noted all information about composers was gathered from Wikipedia.

Leave a comment

You are commenting as guest. Optional login below.

  • 82,500+ cover versions
  • 800+ Cover Albums
  • Album Cover Covers
  • Draw Conclusions on the Wall
  • Magazine Covers
  • Mmmm... I love that Country Pie
  • Translations
  • Participate
  • Tribute bands
  • Tattoo Bob
  • All the latest news and additions
  • Subscribe to our Newsletter
  • Watch Video's
  • Milton Glaser Revisited