Broke Down Engine


Feel like a broke down engine ain't got no drivin' wheel
Feel like a broke down engine ain't got no drivin' wheel
You all been down and lonesome, you know just how a poor man feels.

Been shooting craps and gambling, momma, and I done got broke
Been shooting craps and gambling, momma, and I done got broke
I done pawned my pistol baby, my best clothes been sold.

Lordy, Lord, Lordy, Lordy, Lord, Lordy, Lordy, Lordy
Lordy Lord.

I went down in my praying ground, fell on my bended knees
Went down to my praying ground, fell on my bended knees
I ain't cryin' for no religion, Lord, give me back my good gal please.

If you give me back my baby, I won't worry you no more
Give me back my baby, I won't worry you no more
Don't have to put her in my house, Lordy, just lead her to my door.

Lordy, Lord, Lordy, Lordy, Lord, Lordy, Lordy, Lordy
Lordy Lord.

Can't you hear me baby, rappin' on your door ?
Can't you hear me baby, rappin' on your door ?
Now you hear me tappin', tappin' across your floor.

Feel like a broke down engine, ain't got no drive at all
Feel like a broke down engine, ain't got no drive at all
What made me love my woman, she can really do the Georgia Crawl.

Feel like a broke down engine, ain't got no whistle or bell
Feel like a broke down engine, ain't got no whistle or bell
If you're a real hot momma, come take away Daddy's weeping spell.

Specifications

  • Writer(s): Blind Willie Mctell

  • (First) Album Release: World Gone Wrong
  • Recording date: 1993
  • Released: 1993
  • Copyright: ©1993 Special Rider Music

Blind Willie McTellBlind Willie McTell (born William Samuel McTier; May 5, 1898 – August 19, 1959) was a Piedmont blues and ragtime singer and guitarist. He played with a fluid, syncopated fingerstyle guitar technique, common among many exponents of Piedmont blues. Unlike his contemporaries, he came to use twelve-string guitars exclusively. McTell was also an adept slide guitarist, unusual among ragtime bluesmen. His vocal style, a smooth and often laid-back tenor, differed greatly from many of the harsher voice types employed by Delta bluesmen, such as Charley Patton. McTell performed in various musical styles, including blues, ragtime, religious music and hokum.

McTell was born in Thomson, Georgia. He learned to play the guitar in his early teens. He soon became a street performer in several Georgia cities, including Atlanta and Augusta, and first recorded in 1927 for Victor Records. Although he never produced a major hit record, he had a prolific recording career with different labels and under different names in the 1920s and 1930s. In 1940, he was recorded by the folklorist John A. Lomax and Ruby Terrill Lomax for the folk song archive of the Library of Congress. He was active in the 1940s and 1950s, playing on the streets of Atlanta, often with his longtime associate Curley Weaver. Twice more he recorded professionally. His last recordings originated during an impromptu session recorded by an Atlanta record store owner in 1956. McTell died three years later, having suffered for years from diabetes and alcoholism. Despite his lack of commercial success, he was one of the few blues musicians of his generation who continued to actively play and record during the 1940s and 1950s. He did not live to see the American folk music revival, in which many other bluesmen were "rediscovered'

wikipedia compUnless otherwise noted all information about composers was gathered from Wikipedia.

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